close mobile menu

How to Cook

COOKING BONE-IN PRIME RIB ROAST

How to Cook a Bone-in Prime Rib Roast

Have you ever dreamed of placing a stunning bone-in prime rib roast in the center of your holiday table? Make that dream a reality by learning how to make prime rib like a pro – just imagine the reactions from your friends and family!

A bone-in prime rib roast doesn't just look impressive. Many cooks believe the bones intensify this handsome roast's already-rich beefy flavor. Prime rib also delivers a tender, melt-in-your-mouth texture that is sure to please even the most demanding meat-lover. Best of all, cooking bone-in prime rib at home is simple.

Keep in mind that this expensive cut is best when served rare, medium-rare or medium at most. Overcooking a prime rib will leave it very dry, and you very disappointed.

Everything you need to know about how to prepare prime rib is in the instructions below. We've also included a chart that will tell you the perfect prime rib roast cooking time, whether you choose to roast your bone-in prime rib in the oven or on the grill. Be sure to use a meat thermometer for best results and get ready for an unforgettable celebration!

How to Cook a Bone-In Prime Rib in the Oven

Cooking bone-in prime rib roast in the oven is easy; a hot sear followed by slow roasting at a low temperature delivers outstanding results.

  • Be sure your bone-in prime rib roast is completely thawed. If frozen, thaw it in the refrigerator for at least three days before preparing.
  • Bring the meat to room temperature. Remove your roast from the refrigerator at least an hour (but no more than two hours) before roasting.
  • Season the roast well. Our Kansas City Steak Original Steak Seasoning is an excellent choice.
  • Preheat your oven to 200°F.
  • While the oven preheats, heat a large heavy-bottomed or cast-iron skillet over high heat for about 5 minutes on your stovetop. A very hot pan delivers the best sear.
  • Add a 1-2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to skillet (enough to coat the bottom) and immediately place your roast in the hot skillet. Sear on all sides; use tongs for turning (do not pierce with a fork). Sear for approximately 5 to 10 minutes, until browned on all sides.
  • Once seared, place the roast fat-side up on a rack in a roasting pan. Do not add water or cover the roast. Roast to desired doneness, following the chart below for the perfect bone-in prime rib cooking time.
  • For a 5 ½ pound prime rib roast that is medium-rare, roast for 1.5-2 hours until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the roast registers 125°F. Remember, your roast will continue to warm after removing it from the oven.
  • Transfer your roast to a carving board and tent loosely with aluminum foil. Allow it to rest for 15 to 20 minutes before carving; the temperature of the meat will continue to rise for as much as 10°F during this time (this is called "carryover cooking"). While resting the juices in the roast will redistribute evenly throughout the meat, ensuring the best succulence, texture and flavor. The final temperature for a medium-rare roast should read 135°.
  • Once your bone-in prime rib roast has rested, it's time to carve. Make sure your carving knife is sharp (See our Expert Tips for How to Sharpen a Knife). A long, thin blade works best.
  • It is simplest to remove the bones in a slab, leaving the roast whole and easy to carve. Stand your roast with the bones upright. Hold the bones with your free hand to keep the roast steady. With long firm strokes, cut between the bones and the meat, following the edge of the bones as closely as you can. Cut all the way to the bottom of the roast and remove the rib bones completely.
  • To carve your roast, determine which direction the grain runs (typically parallel to the line of bones). Hold the roast steady with your free hand or a large fork. Using steady, long strokes, cut against the grain, slicing the roast into thin, even slices.
  • Only carve as many slices as you need at a time. This will keep the remaining roast warm for as long as possible and make leftovers easier to store.

Cooking Bone-In Prime Rib on the Grill

Cooking prime rib on the grill adds that unmistakable grilled-over-an-open-flame flavor – and frees up your oven! Follow these instructions to grill an outstanding bone-in prime rib roast.

Charcoal Grill

  • Be sure your prime rib roast is completely thawed. If frozen, thaw it in the refrigerator for at least three days before preparing.
  • Bring the meat to room temperature. Remove your roast from the refrigerator at least an hour (but no more than two hours) before roasting.
  • Season the roast well. Our Kansas City Steak Original Steak Seasoning is an excellent choice.
  • Prepare charcoal grill for indirect cooking by arranging an equal number of charcoal briquettes on each side and placing an aluminum foil drip pan in the middle of the grill. When coals are medium, ash-covered (about 25 minutes), add a few new briquettes to each side. Position the cooking rack handles over coals so adding extra briquettes is easy.
  • While the grill gets hot, heat a large heavy-bottomed or cast-iron skillet over high heat for about 5 minutes on your stovetop. A very hot pan delivers the best sear.
  • Add a 1-2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to skillet (enough to coat the bottom) and immediately place your roast in the hot skillet. Sear on all sides; use tongs for turning (do not pierce with a fork). Sear for approximately 5 to 10 minutes, until browned on all sides.
  • Place the seared prime rib roast on cooking rack directly over the drip pan and cover with the grill lid. Roast to desired doneness, following the chart below for the perfect bone-in prime rib cooking time.
  • You will need to turn your prime rib roast periodically to ensure even cooking.
  • Add three to four additional charcoal briquettes to each side of the grill every 30 minutes or as necessary to maintain proper heat during grilling.
  • For a prime rib roast that is medium-rare, continue to grill for approximately 1.5 hours until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the roast registers 125°F. Remember, your roast will continue to warm after removing it from the grill.
  • Transfer your roast to a carving board and tent loosely with aluminum foil. Allow it to rest for 15 to 20 minutes before carving; the temperature of the meat will continue to rise for as much as 10°F during this time (this is called "carryover cooking"). While resting, the juices in the roast will redistribute evenly throughout the meat, ensuring the best succulence, texture and flavor. The final temperature for a medium-rare roast should read 135°.
  • Once your bone-in prime rib roast has rested, it's time to carve. Make sure your carving knife is sharp (See our Expert Tips for How to Sharpen a Knife). A long, thin blade works best.
  • It is simplest to remove the bones in a slab, leaving the roast whole and easy to carve. Stand your roast with the bones upright. Hold the bones with your free hand to keep the roast steady. With long firm strokes, cut between the bones and the meat, following the edge of the bones as closely as you can. Cut all the way to the bottom of the roast and remove the rib bones completely.
  • To carve your roast, determine which direction the grain runs (typically parallel to the line of bones). Hold the roast steady with your free hand or a large fork. Using steady, long strokes, cut against the grain, slicing the roast into thin, even slices.
  • Only carve as many slices as you need at a time. This will keep the remaining roast warm for as long as possible and make leftovers easier to store.

Gas Grill

  • Be sure your prime rib roast is completely thawed. If frozen, thaw it in the refrigerator for at least two days before preparing.
  • Bring the meat to room temperature. Remove your roast from the refrigerator at least an hour (but no more than two hours) before roasting.
  • Season the roast well. Our Kansas City Steak Original Steak Seasoning is an excellent choice.
  • Preheat grill on high.
  • While the grill gets hot, heat a large heavy-bottomed or cast-iron skillet over high heat for about 5 minutes on your stovetop. A very hot pan delivers the best sear.
  • Add a 1-2 tablespoons of vegetable oil to skillet (enough to coat the bottom) and immediately place your roast in the hot skillet. Sear on all sides; use tongs for turning (do not pierce with a fork). Sear for approximately 15 to 20 minutes, until browned on all sides.
  • Place the seared prime rib roast in the center of the grill and turn off the burners directly under the roast (there's no need for a drip pan when using a gas grill). Close grill lid. Roast to desired doneness, following the chart below for the perfect bone-in prime rib cooking time.
  • You will need to turn your prime rib roast periodically to ensure even cooking.
  • For a prime rib roast that is medium-rare, continue to grill for approximately 1.5 hours until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the roast registers 125°F. Remember, your roast will continue to warm after removing it from the grill.
  • Transfer your roast to a carving board and tent loosely with aluminum foil. Allow it to rest for 15 to 20 minutes before carving; the temperature of the meat will continue to rise for as much as 10°F during this time (this is called "carryover cooking"). While resting, the juices in the roast will redistribute evenly throughout the meat, ensuring the best succulence, texture and flavor. The final temperature for a medium-rare roast should read 135°.
  • Once your bone-in prime rib roast has rested, it's time to carve. Make sure your carving knife is sharp (See our Expert Tips for How to Sharpen a Knife). A long, thin blade works best.
  • It is simplest to remove the bones in a slab, leaving the roast whole and easy to carve. Stand your roast with the bones upright. Hold the bones with your free hand to keep the roast steady. With long firm strokes, cut between the bones and the meat, following the edge of the bones as closely as you can. Cut all the way to the bottom of the roast and remove the rib bones completely.
  • To carve your roast, determine which direction the grain runs (typically parallel to the line of bones). Hold the roast steady with your free hand or a large fork. Using steady, long strokes, cut against the grain, slicing the roast into thin, even slices.
  • Only carve as many slices as you need at a time. This will keep the remaining roast warm for as long as possible and make leftovers easier to store.

Cooking Times

for Bone-in Prime Rib Roast

Follow the cooking temperatures and times below to cook the perfect prime rib roast roast.

5.5 Pound Bone-in Prime Rib Roast
Oven
450° for 15 min
then 275°
Grill
Sear all sides 8 min ttl
indirect heat for:
Rare
Remove at 115°
After resting 125°
1-1.5 hrs 1-1.5 hrs
Medium-Rare
Remove at 125°
After resting 135°
1.5-2 hrs ~1.5 hrs
Medium
Remove at 135°
After resting 145°
2-2.5 hrs 1.5-2 hrs
Medium-Well
Remove at 145°
After resting 155°
2.5-3 hrs 2-2.5 hrs
Select The
Perfect Steak
How to
Carve a Steak
How to
Sharpen a Knife